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In Stock Marble Mantis Hot air Stirling engine car science model Not Steam

In Stock Marble Mantis Hot air Stirling engine car'science model Not Steam

Product Code: P55C96QD
Availability: In Stock
£79.58 £24.11
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The Marble Mantis is a new and unique design of Hot-Air engine designed and made in England. See a video of it working on Youtube here: https://youtu.be/IurFaqF0gSY

Often called Stirling engines after Robert Stirling, the Scottish clergyman responsible for refining the design in the early 19th century, they work by alternately heating (expanding) and cooling (contracting) air within a cylinder forcing a piston in and out. Unlike internal combustion engines which ignite gasoline within the cylinder before expelling the exhaust gasses, Stirlings maintain a closed cycle with the heat-source on the outside.

Hot air engines have seen a resurgence of interest in recent years and are now being used for various green applications such as harvesting solar energy using parabolic reflectors and generating cheap power from waste in third world countries. NASA is currently developing technology to power deep space probes which uses Stirling engines to harness the heat from small nuclear reactors. Eventually they plan to use this principle on a larger scale to generate power for manned bases on the Moon and Mars.

The Marble Mantis arrives at your door in quick-build kit form. It's less likely to get damaged in shipping and is fun to assemble!

All the fiddly, messy bits have been done, leaving you with a straight forward nuts and bolts construction. No glueing is required and the whole assembly should take no more than about 10 minutes to complete. Everything you need is included in the kit except for a pair of pliers and the methylated spirits fuel which you can buy in any hardware store or supermarket.

For those not used to following building instructions from plans I've made an easy-to-follow instructional video on Youtube https://youtu.be/meQux-45CaA. It takes you through every step from unboxing through construction and operation. There is also a double-sided sheet of instructions in clear English included in the box.

Since making my first hot air engine out of tin cans and toy balloons a few years ago I have become hopelessly addicted to designing and building these fascinating machines in my free time.

As I began to refine my building techniques I started trying to devise the very simplest methods of harnessing the Stirling cycle to provide locomotion. The technical challenge was to dispense with the complications of directly driven displacers, piston linkages and cranks yet still somehow allow the engine to propel itself. The practical challenge, no less of a hurdle, was to do everything in my tiny kitchen without any proper machine tools.

The Marble Mantis is the fruition of many months of painstaking trial and error. Starting with a spark of inspiration and ending up, after much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth, with a machine that not only runs reliably but looks good enough to take pride of place on any display shelf.

I hope you enjoy owning the Marble Mantis as much as I enjoyed creating it.

Marek S-Hayward (BSc) Bedfordshire, England.
The Marble Mantis is a new and unique design of Hot-Air engine designed and made in England. See a video of it working on Youtube here: https://youtu.be/IurFaqF0gSY

Often called Stirling engines after Robert Stirling, the Scottish clergyman responsible for refining the design in the early 19th century, they work by alternately heating (expanding) and cooling (contracting) air within a cylinder forcing a piston in and out. Unlike internal combustion engines which ignite gasoline within the cylinder before expelling the exhaust gasses, Stirlings maintain a closed cycle with the heat-source on the outside.

Hot air engines have seen a resurgence of interest in recent years and are now being used for various green applications such as harvesting solar energy using parabolic reflectors and generating cheap power from waste in third world countries. NASA is currently developing technology to power deep space probes which uses Stirling engines to harness the heat from small nuclear reactors. Eventually they plan to use this principle on a larger scale to generate power for manned bases on the Moon and Mars.

The Marble Mantis arrives at your door in quick-build kit form. It's less likely to get damaged in shipping and is fun to assemble!

All the fiddly, messy bits have been done, leaving you with a straight forward nuts and bolts construction. No glueing is required and the whole assembly should take no more than about 10 minutes to complete. Everything you need is included in the kit except for a pair of pliers and the methylated spirits fuel which you can buy in any hardware store or supermarket.

For those not used to following building instructions from plans I've made an easy-to-follow instructional video on Youtube https://youtu.be/meQux-45CaA. It takes you through every step from unboxing through construction and operation. There is also a double-sided sheet of instructions in clear English included in the box.

Since making my first hot air engine out of tin cans and toy balloons a few years ago I have become hopelessly addicted to designing and building these fascinating machines in my free time.

As I began to refine my building techniques I started trying to devise the very simplest methods of harnessing the Stirling cycle to provide locomotion. The technical challenge was to dispense with the complications of directly driven displacers, piston linkages and cranks yet still somehow allow the engine to propel itself. The practical challenge, no less of a hurdle, was to do everything in my tiny kitchen without any proper machine tools.

The Marble Mantis is the fruition of many months of painstaking trial and error. Starting with a spark of inspiration and ending up, after much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth, with a machine that not only runs reliably but looks good enough to take pride of place on any display shelf.

I hope you enjoy owning the Marble Mantis as much as I enjoyed creating it.

Marek S-Hayward (BSc) Bedfordshire, England.